January 28, 2022

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Health workers from Cortés and SPS health districts are trained in the clinical management of patients with COVID-19 - PAHO/WHO

Health workers from Cortés and SPS health districts are trained in the clinical management of patients with COVID-19 – PAHO/WHO

San Pedro Sula, November 22 (PAHO/WHO). In crucial moments of the COVID-19 pandemic, PAHO/WHO, in coordination with the Ministry of Health, enhanced the technical capacities of health staff in COVID-19 wards in San Pedro Sula and Cortes health districts, with the aim of improving the skills of professionals and improving patient care.

The health professionals who participated in the workshops were trained in non-invasive management of the ventilator and on the use of oxygen in patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia. Previously, Dr. Carlos Alvarado Gálvez, a pulmonologist and PAHO/WHO consultant, shared the training methodology with the authorities of the two regions. “The state of Honduras has invested heavily in ventilators, which is why it is so important to train people so that they can operate the devices properly,” said Dr. Alvarado.

To improve patient care in training, the most common problems with non-invasive ventilation were addressed and corrected: skin lesions, leaks, patient agitation and anesthesia, patient feeding, patient/ventilator desynchronization, and weaning non-invasive ventilation

In addition to training to improve the competencies of health professionals, PAHO/WHO has considered support for health regulation of disease, which consists of creating an access resource for up-to-date information, as well as creating local networks of experts comprising of physicians, microbiologists and nurses Experts in managing COVID-19 patients.

This and all activities of the PAHO/WHO sub-offices in Curtis and SPS are made possible thanks to funding from the Government of Canada.

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