May 22, 2022

News Collective

Complete New Zealand News World

New Zealand, Corona virus superstar: almost a normal country |  பயணிப்போம் |  Magazine

New Zealand, Corona virus superstar: almost a normal country | பயணிப்போம் | Magazine

Masks? They are invisible. Social exclusion? No.

DPA

When the leader River 60, Mattie Walter, Tune hit Forever, The weather will explode. Some 50,000 fans This Band Rock New Zealand Link Celebrate by dancing in it Eden Park Auckland, All tickets sold out and they raised their hands in the air.

Pictures of the Six 60s concert in New Zealand on April 24 show the typical climate of the island.

Masks? They are invisible. Social exclusion? No Avana April 24, 2021. Two years ago, the group’s presentation would not have made news outside of this Pacific nation, but in times of epidemics these films would quickly go around the world.

There were no masks or distances at the Six 60 band concert in New Zealand in April.

Many are rubbing their eyes in despair: in many countries people have to stay at home and strict restrictions have to be imposed, a small country on the other side of the planet seems to have already been forgotten.

Although it is internationally known that no other country is as successfully fighting the corona virus as New Zealand, these photos and videos are like a concert. ஆறு 60, Awareness of contradiction.

Kate Liddington, 34, a kindergarten teacher, recently attended a recital of musicians in the northern city of Northland and said it was a “wonderful experience”. Not only is the band brilliant, “he says,” especially since we are the only country that can host these concerts.

Return to the “normal” state

Massive events like this are remembered by many New Zealanders, and how many countries are still struggling with massive restrictions against the rise of COVID-19 infections. “We look at the news and sometimes say ‘Wow!’ It makes our eyes open Recognize how lucky we are and how safe we ​​are in New Zealand ”, Kia de Kira-Nolan says she has been attending frequent mass events such as concerts and sporting events in recent months.

The traditional Oktoberfest Beer Festival had to stop in Munich for the second year in a row in Germany. New Zealand’s Wildfoods Festival brings together 10,000 people in March In Hokitika, on the South Island.

As usual, the menu includes exquisite delicacies such as huhu beetle larvae, roasted locusts and pork nipples, which can be tasted in a circle of friends from afar.

People in Auckland celebrate the victory of the New Zealand team in the trophy of the United States. (DPA) Photo: Rebecca Lyle

On the other hand, tens of thousands of sea fans celebrated the New Zealand team’s fourth victory in March Cup tour of the United States in Auckland. The matches of the Super Rugby Autorowa Tournament each week attract stadiums packed with 20,000 spectators.

“It’s crazy to think that we live almost normal lives here, while the rest of the world is locked up at home, telecommunications and almost studying at home,” says kindergarten teacher Lydington.

New Zealanders greet each other instead of an infected foot salute or happy elbow pump Shaking hands. Some may accurately list cases of wearing a mask, for example, on airplanes and other public transportation.

Yes there were protocols

But this island nation knows how to cross one Severe imprisonment from March to May 2020. This was followed by a cleverly accurate contact detection strategy and the goal was not only to stop the virus, but to eradicate it completely.

To do this, the government of Prime Minister Jacinta Order closed the borders fourteen months ago. The journey is difficult and only possible for a good reason. This is the price that people have to pay for their great freedom.

In the meantime, They can travel to Australia and the Cook Islands from May 17 without re-isolation. Since the outbreak began, five million people in New Zealand have lived in their Gaelic village like Asterix and Obelix: “The whole world is infected with a virus. Around the world? No!

For this reason, Artern proudly refers to his people as his own “Five Million Group”. If a corona virus case somehow appears here or there, the affected area will be placed under severe but generally short imprisonment, while life in other parts of the country usually continues its course.

“Only when we watch the news at night do we remember everything that happens everywhere, especially now with these terrifying images from India,” says journalist Laura Mills, who lives in the southern island port city of Gremouth.

Mills is very pleased with the policy adopted by New Zealand in dealing with the epidemic. But at the same time, she feels isolated from the rest of the world. “My parents are in the UK. And if it continues like this, it will be many years before they see me or the grandchildren again,” he responds. (I)

See also  New Zealand law to ban alternative therapies