October 26, 2021

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WHO calls for health to be a priority at COP26

WHO calls for health to be a priority at COP26

qualification: WHO calls for health to be a priority at COP26

SLUG: Health and Climate Change

Date: October 12, 2021

Author: Celia Mendoza

text editor

Lugar: New York Uno

Area of ​​interest: WORLD-LATAM

Duration: 2:08

Video source: private

Reuters: VADU2EO93-OWUNTCunifeed210826a-VAELTBIO7-VAELTBIO7-VAEFZJ2VB-VAE8HWVGN- WDEWHWCIH

Introduction: World leaders will gather in Scotland at the end of this month to revitalize their commitments on climate change. The World Health Organization has demanded that health be the champion at this summit. Celia Mendoza at the United Nations explains.

script

Dr Maria Neira of the World Health Organization emphasized that the impact of climate change on the health of the world’s population should be a priority during the COP26 Climate Summit to be held in Glasgow, Scotland.

((Dr Maria Neira – Director of Environment, Climate Change and Health Department at WHO 00:13-00:27))

“We know very well that climate change is affecting the pillars of health, food, water, air and housing quality. So, as you can imagine, all of this will pose a significant risk to our health.”

“We know very well that climate change affects the pillars of our health, food, water, air quality and shelter. So, as you can imagine, all of this will present a significant risk to our health.”

Proof of this is the latest report in the journal Nature Climate Change, whose study revealed that at least 85% of the world’s population has been exposed to natural phenomena exacerbated by climate change.

((Jordi Reich – President of the International Committee of the Red Cross for Mexico and Central America – 00:41-00:57))

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“Loss of livelihood, whether it’s in the form of a small shop that a family can own in a hurricane-devastated community, or in agricultural fields, certainly has an impact on the food availability of the population.”

In Latin America, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Food Program, millions of people are at risk of starvation, which puts this population at risk of malnutrition, which according to scientific studies is linked to heart disease and cancer. and diabetes.

In addition, the health effects of extreme heat waves and air pollution are placing even greater strains on health systems in the wake of the pandemic.

((Howard Catton, CEO, International Council of Nurses – 01:24-01:45))

“Coronavirus and climate change are exacerbating each other and putting more pressure on health systems and already vulnerable employees. This is why going as usual is not an option. Which is why we now really need health to be at the heart of all our energy, transport, agriculture and water policies. and food.”

“Coronavirus and climate change are compounding each other, adding stress to health systems and already vulnerable employees. This is why business as usual is not an option. That is why we now need health to really be at the heart of all our policies, energy, transportation, agriculture, water , and food.”

((Celia Mendoza VOA-UN-01:45-02:08))
The World Health Organization has urged world leaders to invest in adaptation to face climate change, and to strengthen health care systems and health service facilities. Emphasize that any investment to reduce emissions will have a direct benefit to the health of the world’s population. Celia Mendoza. The Voice of America. United nations”.

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