May 19, 2022

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Biden assesses the impact of Hurricane Ida in the United States - Prinsa Latina

Biden assesses the impact of Hurricane Ida in the United States – Prinsa Latina

Before the impact of the hurricane on August 29, the president approved a declaration of emergency for that country and shortly after the climatic phenomenon penetrated the national soil, he gave a press conference, in which he warned of the danger it posed to life.

Biden said they expect massive devastation, characterized by blackouts that could last for weeks for residents along the Gulf Coast of Mexico.

“The devastation is likely to be massive,” he said, predicting that not only in the south, in the north of the country, the effects of the stormy weather will be felt from the residual heavy rains.

According to reports, it is still impossible to quantify the total physical damage, especially in Louisiana, but at least five deaths have been confirmed there after the impact of Ida, which degenerated into a tropical storm upon entering the United States.

Southern Governor John Bel Edwards asked residents who were evacuated on Tuesday to remain in such a state because it is too early to consider returning home.

Many elements of life-supporting infrastructure are missing, elements that are not working at the moment. So if you’ve already been evacuated, don’t come back here, or southeast Louisiana, until the emergency preparedness office tells you everything is ready to receive you.

Schools are not open, businesses and hospitals are not overflowing, he said, explaining that there will be no “running water or electricity in the house”.

According to the PowerOutage.US tracker, nearly 1 million customers in Louisiana and about 30,000 in Mississippi were without power.

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Some areas have warned that the blackout could last up to a month while they recover from Ida.

Nine more deaths were recorded in New York and New Jersey as a result of heavy rains and floods that left the remnants of a hydrometeorological phenomenon in the Northeast National Territory.

Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana on the same day as Hurricane Katrina 16 years ago, one of the five deadliest events of its kind in US history.

Research over the past decade has found that, on average, the rapid intensification of hurricanes increases, in part because the oceans, which supply them with energy, are warming due to man-made greenhouse gas emissions.

mgt / dfm